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Passenger, "Feather on the Clyde"

Passenger, "Feather on the Clyde"

Selected Composition

 

Passenger, "Feather on the Clyde"

 

 

Program Notes

 

One of Mike Rosenberg's, aka Passenger's, most lovely songs, one of the most beautiful songs that I know period, is "Feather on the Clyde." Here is a link to Passenger's official YouTube site, and to a video of Passenger singing this song. He is joined by two other artists, Emma Louise and Stu Larson, for harmony and harmonica—

 

Those of you who first hear this song by following the link, please leave a comment below, and let me know what you think of it:


Passenger, "Feather on the Clyde" 

 

This sad and beautiful song almost made me use something I have hesitated to employ, so far, in this blog—that is: saying if you listen to nothing else I write about, listen to this. I am not saying that now (I'm not sure what I will use that for)—but I considered it here, which says something.

 

Here is a link to the song on Amazon.com, if you want to download it. None of the recordings available to download are of the beautiful version in the music video above; I will link to an acoustic version in which Passenger accompanies himself alone on the guitar:


Passenger, "Feather on the Clyde"

 

 

Coda

 

The Clyde is the river that flows through Glasgow, Scotland. I have walked along that river, and over a Victorian bridge that crosses it, and on to a museum displaying Roman artifacts found in and around Glasgow, despite the city being north of Hadrian's Wall.

 

I was in Glasgow in 1993 for the World Science Fiction Convention. My story "Mrs. Lincoln's Chia" was a finalist for the Hugo award that year. After the convention, I drove north along the west coast of Scotland to Loch Lomond and Loch Ness, on to Inverness, then south down the east coast—the east coast of Scotland is like something out of fantasy: fjord after fjord and on every peak a castle.

 

I stopped in Newtonmore, at the headquarters of the McPherson Clan. By the entrance were tall apiaries—and inside the building, one can look through glass into the teeming beehives. They make Stag's Breath Whiskey there, from honeycomb and heather. Only recently has it begun to be exported to this country. I keep a bottle in my study. I drink one shot glass of the whiskey only when I sell a poem.

 

 

 

 

I created "Instead of the Laughter of Men," the image above, in 2006. It is based on Mandelbrot fractals. The title is from the tenth-century Old English poem "The Seafarer":


I took to myself as pleasure,
the gannet's noise
and the voice of the curlew
instead of the laughter of men,
the singing gull
instead of the drinking of mead.
Storms there beat the stony cliffs,
where the tern spoke.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Passenger, "Golden Leaves"

Passenger, "Golden Leaves"

On the Banks of Loch Lomond: Interview with Bryant Bell

On the Banks of Loch Lomond: Interview with Bryant Bell