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The Sunken Cathedral

The Sunken Cathedral

Selected Composition

 

Claude Debussy, The Sunken Cathedral

 

 

Program Notes

 

Debussy wrote The Sunken Cathedral in 1910 as part of his first book of preludes for the piano. It is a piano masterwork meant to evoke an ancient Breton legend about a submerged cathedral that would rise up on clear days, and from which you could hear monks chanting and bells ringing. Sometimes, mariners would hear these bells even when the cathedral was underwater. Debussy's music is evocative, and, at times, majestic.

 

Today, I listened to a 1994 recording of Paul Crossley playing Debussy's The Sunken Cathedral (from the album Greatest Hits: Debussy):


Claude Debussy, The Sunken Cathedral

 

NOTE: For a more in-depth discussion of Debussy and Impressionism, please see my upcoming post on Debussy's birthday, 22 August.

 

 

 

 

I created "My Life Is but the Life of Winds and Tides," the image above, in 2006. It is based on Mandelbrot fractals. The title is from the 1819 poem Hyperion, by the English Romantic poet John Keats:


My life is but the life of winds and tides, 
No more than winds and tides can I avail:— 
But thou canst.—Be thou therefore in the van
Of circumstance; yea, seize the arrow's barb
Before the tense string murmur.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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